greco-roman theatre

Inside the 3rd century BC Greek theatre at Taormina in Sicily. It sits atop of a terrace on Mount Tauro some 250m above sea level.

The theatre is largely constructed from brick and most probably dates to the Roman period, but it is arranged in accordance with that of the ancient Greeks and it is supposed that the Romans rebuilt the theatre (1st century AD) upon the foundations of an older theatre from the Greek period. The stage has been arranged so that Mount Etna is visible in the background, though the Romans mainly used the theatre for gladiatorial contests.

The theatre is still put to use today and in the summer it hosts an international arts festival. No fights to the death though…

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12 Comments

    1. Thanks! I do have a general leaning towards monochrome, but in these situations I feel it definitely adds “weight” to the subject matter and somehow makes them feel more “real” and mysterious.

  1. An awe inspiring image. I have yet to get to this neck of the world. And on the heels of some of these recent post, just a great ancient vibe. Looks like you found a great vista here and timing with the light coming in so well from the left.

    1. Thanks. Sicily is rich with history (Greeks, Phoenicians, Romans, Normans, and apparently even the Vikings, have all been here) and the island is littered with amazing ruins and historic buildings. I wish I had been able to spend more time there.

      I got lucky with the light! But the complex was quite large and I spent some time exploring it for good viewpoints and compositions. This seemed an obvious one.

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